The Bainbridge Island Historical Museum

In the building’s 110-year existence, it has been poked and prodded, repainted, rewired, moved from one end of the island to the other, retrofitted with an annex and lifted to dig a basement to provide climate-controlled storage and more research space. Fittingly, the little red schoolhouse containing the artifacts of Bainbridge Island’s colorful history is, itself, a remnant of Bainbridge’s past. Home to the award-winning Bainbridge Island Historical Museum, the 1,000-square-foot building has led multiple lives, all of them on the island. Read more here

Kitsap County’s Historic General Stores

It’s the kind of business where the same regulars hold court each morning over coffee — a place where you can drop by to pick up a carton of milk and check out the community bulletin board, and find a water bowl pit stop for neighborhood dogs.

The area’s small, historic general stores were built to anchor their communities. It was the logical location for the settlement’s new post office, allowing the mercantile’s owner or spouse, who typically lived on the premises, to serve a dual role as postmaster. The merge made the store the hub for far-flung neighbors to catch up on news while buying flour (6 cents a pound), potatoes (2 cents a pound), bolts of muslin, boots and buttons.

Read more here…..

Mossback: Farm to Table Dining in Kingston

Mossback. It’s a slang term for anyone who prefers the gray drizzle of the Pacific Northwest to its elusive, sunny days. And we all know what happens sans sunlight — moss grows.

Except in Kingston. There, Mossback is a restaurant with an ever-changing farm-to-table menu, a supportive community of local family farmers and producers whose organic handiwork inspires the kitchen, and a trio of hardworking owners who don’t mind pulling on a pair of overalls and boots to weed and prune in the rain.

Check it out here.

The Floating Art Galleries of the Washington State Ferries

It’s easy to bypass the artwork. For regular ferry riders, it can blend into the gestalt of a daily commute on the Washington State Ferries. And yet each of the 23 current ferries in the system is a floating art gallery — a curated exhibit of wooden masks, paintings, historical photographs and prints celebrating the ferry’s name, the communities it serves and Washington’s Native American culture. Read the rest of the article here.

Kitsap Explorers Exploring the Expat Life

This post isn’t about what’s inside Kitsap County but instead about some intrepid Kitsapers who have chosen a temporary or permanent overseas expat life. Ranging from Gig Harbor to Bainbridge Island they’ve lived in Lebanon, Paris, Morocco and for one couple, nomadic stopovers all over the world chasing summer. And, they have plenty of advice should you be considering the lifestyle which you can find here.

Slippery Pig Brewery: Poulsbo

To row single-handedly from Poulsbo on the Kitsap Peninsula in Washington State to Seattle in a small rowboat requires propelling some 16 nautical miles through a major transportation waterway teeming with ferries, Alaskan- bound cruise ships, container vessels and recreational boaters. It also demands navigation of the Ballard Locks, two gates that connect fresh and salt water and even out the 20- foot difference in elevation between them.

It had long been the goal of Dave Lambert, Poulsbo’s kilt-wearing brewmaster and owner of the Slippery Pig Brewery, to deliver a keg of beer “the old-fashioned way.” His Norwegian ancestors had settled in the Poulsbo area in 1882, five generations before when the family’s human-powered boats plied the waterway between the frontier of the forested peninsula and growing city of Seattle to sell eggs. Inspired by their perseverance, it took Lambert seven hours to make the solo trip in a fiberglass rowboat named the Watery Tart and, of course, he rowed clad in his kilt. To read more click here.

La Fermata Restaurant: Bremerton Upscale Italian Cuisine

Bremerton’s La Fermata Restaurant is more than a dining locale. In existence for eighteen years, it’s now an institution in the Manette neighborhood keeping an eye on the area’s evolving and newly upscale business community while serving classic and nouveau Italian cuisine. Read about it here.

Kingston’s Concerts at the Barn Create Community around Music

The inspiration for a singer-songwriter concert series in a countrified Kingston barn began with a wedding. When Poulsbo’s Chuck and Stacie Power decided to get married, they knew they wanted a local, rustic setting. Conveniently, Chuck Power’s cycling buddy, Mark Schorn, and Schorn’s wife, Lynn, had a barn on their Kingston property and enthusiastically agreed to play hosts. WSHG.NET | Concerts at the Barn Create Community around Music | Featured, Food & Entertainment | October 9, 2017 | WestSound Home & Garden

Belfair’s Etched Glass Artist:

Around Belfair it’s still called Hippie Hill Community. It was some old friends and the price of the land that drew glass artist, Randy Calm and his wife, Cathy from Chicago to Hippie Hill nearly 47 years ago. Then, there were thirteen homesteading families, no electricity and the couple lived in a teepee while hand building their house with some help from their neighbors.  “I don’t think anybody knew what they were doing then”, laughed Calm, “but the house is still standing.” To make a living the couple worked at the now defunct Werberger Winery near Grapeview where they ran the tasting room, worked in the vineyard and learned about winemaking.

They’ve come a long way since those days. Not only is their house still standing but their property is also the home of Phoenix Design South, Calm’s hand built studio where he turns out custom designed residential and commercial etched glass. Read more about glass artist Randy Calm in my WestSound Home and Garden article here.

Summer’s Dog Days & Rolling Bay Winery

The dog days of summer are unusually doggy here in ExplorationKitsap land. We normally enjoy temperate daylight weather to do our thing, but with successive days of 90 degree plus temperatures and hazy skies from the fires in Canada, I’m reversing my active time of day. This morning I went for a power walk, shopped for groceries, watered and dead-headed my outdoor plants and baked up some barbecued chicken, all before 8 AM to take advantage of cooler weather. Last night I sipped a glass of my favorite local wine in the dark on my deck for the same reason.

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Fusion is a white blend made by Rolling Bay Winery, a Bainbridge Island establishment with a river rock tasting room resembling a Hobbit house. Fusion is my favorite wine to drink while listening to live outdoor music on the tasting room patio; my favorite wine to drink in the dark on my deck and my favorite wine in which to drop frozen peach slices. Shhh. Don’t tell Alphonse de Klerk, Fusion’s affable Dutch maker that I do that. Though really….it’s the perfect dog days of summer libation.  It might also be best not to mention that I drink my peach infused Fusion in a copper Moscow Mule mug because if it’s good enough for vodka and ginger beer, it’s perfect for a lovely white table wine.

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Rolling Bay Winery has a schedule of tastings accompanied by live music throughout the summer at its Hobbit house location and exciting plans to open a second larger tasting room and production facility a few miles away.  Check them out. No Moscow Mule Mugs. No frozen peaches. Just a great selection of award-winning whites, reds and a rose served properly in a wine glass, sipped on a sunny patio/lawn to live music. What better way to while away summer’s dog days?