Seabeck: Guillemot Cove Nature Reserve

“People really live out here?” I found myself repeatedly muttering on the drive to find Guillemot Cove Nature Reserve for my post on the Shire of Kitsap. (I’m a Kitsap urban dweller. I walk to the grocery store, the dentist, the post office, three local brewpubs, restaurants and the monthly art gallery walk.) Then I’d round a back roads narrow corner and there would be a guy in a Seahawks jersey walking his poodle or a woman out for a run (they all waved) or a large home set back in the trees. Getting to Guillemot requires turning west off the highway, following the road to Seabeck and taking two more turns on increasingly narrow roads til you can go no further or drive into Hood Canal. Its the kind of place mostly trod by the US Postal Service, Puget Sound Energy and intrepid Kitsap adventurers.

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It didn’t help that the sky was colored Northwest Gray or that it was the first dry day in five. Everything seems longer and more primeval when its wettish and darkish. It also seems much more Hobbitish – like Mirkwood in Middle-earth.

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Originally called Frenchman’s Cove after Henri Querrette, who had a cabin on the cove, the nature reserve was renamed Guillemot after the ubiquitous small black seabird by the Reynolds family who homesteaded the original 80 acres of the now 184 acre park.

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The reserve still has remnants of it’s former human inhabitants including a barn built in 1940 by the Reynolds family out of wood milled on the property. The barn was destroyed in a 2014 windstorm.

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In 1946 the Reynolds family built a summer beach house known as the Nest House which is slowly giving way to vines and weather.

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Off trail its easy to spot other vestiges of human habitation such as the rusted remains of this vehicle.

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But its Mother Nature who plays the starring role here. The Reserve hosts a rare old growth stand of cedar maple. In addition to being a bird habitat, there are beaver dams everywhere. Boyce Creek flows downhill through the property and after rainy spells the reserve becomes noisy with water flow coming making its way to the creek or downhill to Hood Canal. It’s a mandatory galoshes kind of place if you want to explore it in the winter or spring seasons.

It’s also evolving trail-wise as the creek seeks new tributaries and bridges get washed out. There’s a trail map on the Guillermot Cove county parks website that may not be entirely accurate or to scale. It’s best to print it out and bring it along if you want to explore the reserve or find the Stump House.

 

 

 

The Shire of Kitsap

My brother, Tony, thinks he’s Bilbo Baggins. Its not that he’s delusional, but in his job working for a UN humanitarian agency, he lives a nomadic life, often in the most inhospitable of places and so he identifies with the wandering Hobbit of the Shire. It may be the reason he calls Poulsbo his permanent home when not off burglaring with the Dwarves to reclaim the Lonely Mountain. Kitsap County resembles the Shire.

When you have a brother who channels Bilbo Baggins, it’s difficult to ignore all things “hobbitish”. That’s why I stopped for a closer look at this Bainbridge structure on High School Road while driving the island doing research on labyrinths of Kitsap County. The Bainbridge building has been dubbed the Hobbit House according to one of its neighbors. It’s available as a vacation rental (the sign posted out front advertises 206-842-0255 for inquiries) and it comes with its own miniature Hobbit playhouse for…..well, really tiny Hobbits.

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Bainbridge’s Hobbit House looks suspiciously like the Old Mill owned by the Sandyman family in the village of Hobbiton in the Shires where Bilbo lived.

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The Brothers Greenhouses in Gorst near Port Orchard is where the replica of Bagshot Row and Bilbo’s hobbit hole, Bag End (sans its green door) is located. Built by the owners as a way to showcase garden creativity and plants, the house was decorated with Christmas lights when I visited in December. The tiny hobbit hole’s interior, though smaller than Bag End, is paneled and even sports a faux fireplace. Its available to visit anytime during the nursery’s open hours and the friendly staff are willing to share its origins.

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The Hobbits of the Shire referred to the Elves as fairies and the owners and staff at Brothers cater to the Fellowship by specializing in how to entice them to visit by building fairy gardens. The greenhouse has an entire section devoted to fairy-sized furniture and accessories and offers classes on fairy gardens.

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Guillamot Cove Nature Reserve in Seabeck is the site of the “hobbitish” Stump House. Well signed and easily reached, the Stump House sits on 158 acres of land and trails that were purchased by the Trust for Public Land for public use. There is a rumor the Stump House was built by Dirty Thompson, a criminal who used it as a hideout.  I’m sure it’s a Hobbit-invented story intended to deter the Orcs.

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This week happens to be my brother’s birthday. This is not my brother. It’s a late birthday gift – the Bilbo Baggins costume that awaits his next visit when he returns from the Misty Mountains to wander the Shire. You’re welcome, Tony.

ADDENDUM:  Tony read my post and texted, “It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.” Such a Bilbo he is.