The Bainbridge Island Historical Museum

In the building’s 110-year existence, it has been poked and prodded, repainted, rewired, moved from one end of the island to the other, retrofitted with an annex and lifted to dig a basement to provide climate-controlled storage and more research space. Fittingly, the little red schoolhouse containing the artifacts of Bainbridge Island’s colorful history is, itself, a remnant of Bainbridge’s past. Home to the award-winning Bainbridge Island Historical Museum, the 1,000-square-foot building has led multiple lives, all of them on the island. Read more here

Kitsap County’s Historic General Stores

It’s the kind of business where the same regulars hold court each morning over coffee — a place where you can drop by to pick up a carton of milk and check out the community bulletin board, and find a water bowl pit stop for neighborhood dogs.

The area’s small, historic general stores were built to anchor their communities. It was the logical location for the settlement’s new post office, allowing the mercantile’s owner or spouse, who typically lived on the premises, to serve a dual role as postmaster. The merge made the store the hub for far-flung neighbors to catch up on news while buying flour (6 cents a pound), potatoes (2 cents a pound), bolts of muslin, boots and buttons.

Read more here…..

Mossback: Farm to Table Dining in Kingston

Mossback. It’s a slang term for anyone who prefers the gray drizzle of the Pacific Northwest to its elusive, sunny days. And we all know what happens sans sunlight — moss grows.

Except in Kingston. There, Mossback is a restaurant with an ever-changing farm-to-table menu, a supportive community of local family farmers and producers whose organic handiwork inspires the kitchen, and a trio of hardworking owners who don’t mind pulling on a pair of overalls and boots to weed and prune in the rain.

Check it out here.

The Floating Art Galleries of the Washington State Ferries

It’s easy to bypass the artwork. For regular ferry riders, it can blend into the gestalt of a daily commute on the Washington State Ferries. And yet each of the 23 current ferries in the system is a floating art gallery — a curated exhibit of wooden masks, paintings, historical photographs and prints celebrating the ferry’s name, the communities it serves and Washington’s Native American culture. Read the rest of the article here.

Kingston’s Concerts at the Barn Create Community around Music

The inspiration for a singer-songwriter concert series in a countrified Kingston barn began with a wedding. When Poulsbo’s Chuck and Stacie Power decided to get married, they knew they wanted a local, rustic setting. Conveniently, Chuck Power’s cycling buddy, Mark Schorn, and Schorn’s wife, Lynn, had a barn on their Kingston property and enthusiastically agreed to play hosts. WSHG.NET | Concerts at the Barn Create Community around Music | Featured, Food & Entertainment | October 9, 2017 | WestSound Home & Garden

Port Gamble’s Tea Room

I’m a sucker for a pot of Earl Grey tea paired with fresh scones, Devon cream and jam. It must be the Randall in me though I happen to know my English forebearers came from sturdy tenant/serf stock and likely never set foot in the manor for high tea.

Poulsbo had a tea shop which disappeared several months ago and recently resurfaced in Port Gamble as Mrs. Muir’s House: Tea and Treasures. Located in one of Port Gamble’s adorable historic Victorian houses, the setting seems a more fitting location for a spot of tea. Christine Wingren, Tea Artist and Curator, owned the Poulsbo tea shop and moved to Port Gamble for its ambiance.

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The front half of the tea shop is where you find the treasures. Teas. Teapots. Teacups. Tea towels. Jams. And every possible tea time accessory imaginable.

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There’s a Harry Potter room filled with retail treasures to inspire the retail in fans of the J.K. Rowlings wizarding world series.

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The back of the shop is the tearoom. Each table is a curated version of English propriety. Lace tablecloths, china teacups, chintz. There’s a small room that accommodates single parties or you can be served in the sunny main room.

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The menu includes sandwiches and crepes as well as fresh lemonade and ginger beer, but I was there for the Devon cream and scones. It did not disappoint. There are two types of tea services – Cream Tea which consists of scones, Devonshire cream, jam and marmalade and fresh fruit as well as a pot of tea, all for $7.95 or Full Tea which includes all of that plus a sandwich and side for $15.95.

Mrs. Muirs House: Tea & Treasures is open Thursday through Tuesday from 10AM to 5PM.

Port Gamble Museum: A Hidden Gem

If you haven’t ventured into Port Gamble’s little gem of a historical museum, you’ve missed a western shores of Puget Sound educational treat. Located in the basement of the 1916 era Port Gamble General Store, the Port Gamble Historical Museum is often mistaken for the better known Sea and Shore Museum located on the upper floor of the store, even by locals.

No. Not the same at all. Follow the sidewalk and stairs outside to the back of the General Store to find the unassuming entrance of the Historical Museum. Designed in 1972 by Alec James, who designed the Royal British Museum in Victoria, Canada, the museum is not a quaint, small town operation. Its a professionally designed museum packed into a small space that showcases the 125 year plus history of the Pope And Talbot Lumber Mill and company town that it built.

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Upon entering, visitors first see a recreation of the interior of the ship, Oriental, whose Captain, William C. Talbot and crew came from East Machias, Maine to settle Port Gamble. The ship creaks and groans and the porthole displays a moving ocean, enough to make one seasick if you watch it long enough. Captain Talbot’s actual ship log can be read in a glass display case in his quarters.

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Recreation of the interiors of important buildings using the actual furniture, dishes and silver wear was part of the design. The lobby of the long gone Puget Sound Hotel is there complete with music from its hey day as the social gathering place. The bedroom of settlers, Cyrus and Emily Walker has been recreated using period furnishings and specially commissioned wallpaper that copied the original found in their bedroom. There is a replica of the inside of the Pope and Talbot sales office and a S’Klallam Native American dwelling, the original settlers of Port Gamble.

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Display cases showcase period fans and wedding dresses, Native American baskets and tools used by the men and women who worked in the mill. There are letters, records and photographs of the non-Native men and women who settled and made Port Gamble their home.

Give yourself time when you visit. The museum, though not the multi floor bohemoth of the Royal British Museum, is a place that needs savoring. The volunteers who keep the museum running are very informative and, if you ask, will show you the back room that houses all of the archived and unlabeled artifacts that have been donated, unearthed and found in attics and crevices of the historical homes and buildings that make up Port Gamble.

MUSEUM FEES:

Adults: $4.00

Students/Seniors/Military: $3.00 

Children six and under free

 MUSEUM HOURS:

May 1st through September 30th: 10:00 a.m. to5 p.m seven days a week.

 October 1st through April 30th: 11:00 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday/Saturday/Sunday.